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Congressman Tom McClintock

Representing the 4th District of California

Fiscal and Economic

More on Fiscal and Economic

January 11, 2019 Vote Notes on Legislation
This bill funds Interior and related agencies through the end of the fiscal year. Setting aside the current impasse over border security, the bill is ill-advised on its merits. It plusses up almost every request made by the administration, with the notable exception of PILT funding that compensates rural communities that are slammed by excessive federal ownership of land in their jurisdictions. It reduces funds approved by the Republican House last year for hazardous fuels reduction, national park maintenance, and water infrastructure...
January 10, 2019 Vote Notes on Legislation
Setting aside the impasse over funding border security, this bill is also ill-advised on its merits. This bill increases funding for the 1930’s era farm subsidies that have squandered billions of taxpayer dollars to inflate consumer prices ($40+ billion), jeopardized taxpayer money in risky high-risk housing markets where lenders fear to tread ($25 billion), doles out almost $2 billion for international food hand-outs, continues the food stamp program with no serious attempt to remove the disincentives to work that the program creates ($73 billion), and continues us on the spending trajectory established by the BBA. But once again, they couldn’t find $5.7 billion for a secure border wall.
January 10, 2019 Vote Notes on Legislation
Setting aside the impasse over funding border security, this bill is ill-advised on its merits. It continues to drain $9.9 billion of motorists’ taxes paid at the pump away from highways in favor of mass transit subsidies, continues to fund absurdly wasteful programs such as subsidized air service ($155 million), money-losing Amtrak routes ($1.9 billion), local grant programs which have been used to fund such nonsense as “Doggy Day Care” centers ($3.4 billion), and massive housing subsidies to ameliorate the affordability crisis caused by government restrictions and mandates on home construction ($30+ billion). But they couldn’t find any money for a border wall. Worst of all, it continues the irresponsible spending trajectory established by the so-called BBA (formally the “Bi-Partisan Budget Act” but more accurately the “Budget Busting Act”) that is quickly leading us to trillion-dollar annual deficits despite increased tax revenues.
January 3, 2019 Vote Notes on Legislation
H. Res. 6 - House Rules: NO. This measure paves the way for a spending spree at a time the federal government is approaching $22 trillion of debt and trillion-dollar annual deficits. It takes the required 3/5 vote for tax increases to a simple majority, in effect declaring open season on American taxpayers. It automatically suspends the debt limit upon adoption of a budget, essentially removing any constraint on deficit spending. It modifies the current PAYGO rule to constrain the administration’s ability to administratively reduce spending. It makes a few improvements, such as requiring text of a bill to be available 72 hours prior to votes, but these are dwarfed by opening the floodgates on massive tax and spending increases.
January 3, 2019 Vote Notes on Legislation
H.R. 21 - Annual Appropriations: NO. This is an appropriation to continue spending for the departments, except Homeland Security, that are affected by the shutdown. The rate of spending keeps us on a collision course with trillion-dollar annual deficits. It also reauthorizes the TANF welfare program without reforms necessary to stop rampant fraud and it reauthorizes flood insurance subsidies that encourage development in flood plains.
June 27, 2018 Speeches
My amendment takes all the policy reforms in the budget resolution and writes those savings into the reconciliation instructions. This does not change a single recommendation that we have been debating. It simply implements them – about $3.55 trillion over ten years after removing interest payments and non-reconcilable items under the Byrd Rule.
June 8, 2018 Vote Notes on Legislation
This is a combination of appropriations bills that funds the legislative branch, the Veteran’s Administration, energy, water and military construction. Like any large, omnibus bill it has good features, among them: it proceeds with the long overdue Yucca Mountain nuclear storage facility, repeals the Obama Administration’s WOTUS order (which was already struck down by the courts), shifts $1 billion of mandatory spending to discretionary and upgrades our nuclear arsenal. But it is a fiscal train wreck. It continues the Congress’ profligate spending that threatens...
April 27, 2018 Speeches
I have offered this amendment whenever the opportunity has presented itself, because it tests whether there is any program in the federal budget that Congress can bear to cut.
April 26, 2018 Speeches
In December, we adopted one of the most important tax reform laws in our nation’s history. It is producing higher wages, better job opportunities, and greater economic expansion than we’ve seen in a decade. But having cut taxes, we assumed an urgent responsibility to restrain spending. Taxes and debt are two sides of the same coin. A debt is simply a future tax. Once we’ve spent a dollar, we’ve already decided to tax it, either now or in the future. It’s the spending that’s the problem.
April 10, 2018 Speeches
It’s important to ask ourselves how the tax reform is doing, and I thank my colleague for organizing this time tonight. In my district, the average family is paying $1,900 LESS federal income tax this year – which means $1,900 MORE they can spend to meet their needs.