HR 4783 - Claims Resolution Act of 2010

Mr. Speaker:  Titles 3 through 6 of the bill purport to settle four water rights claims against the United States by signing away the public’s right to nearly 300 BILLION gallons of water annually AND in perpetuity -- in addition to spending more than $1.2 billion.

          The proponents of the bill are correct that if taxpayers will end up paying more if the claims go to trial, then we should settle out of court.  But I sincerely doubt this is the case.

          For the better part of a year, I asked for a legal opinion from the Attorney General on this question -- to no avail -- until a day before the issue was first brought to the House floor. What we received was not a legal opinion assessing the validity of the claims or the extent of the taxpayers’ liability.  It was a general statement of their preference for settling claims rather than litigating them.

          And it is undermined by many specific objections raised by the Administration.  For example, with respect to the White Mountain Apache settlement, the Department of Interior wrote on November 15: “This authorizes federal appropriations for numerous tribal projects that are extraneous to settlement,” and urged “these projects should be considered on their own merits in separate authorizing legislation.”  Last year, it warned that funding would “be excessive if it were viewed as settlement consideration.”

          They also warned of language – still in the bill – which waives the sovereign immunity of the United States for future litigation.  They warned, “this provision will engender additional litigation – and likely in competing state and federal forums – rather than resolving the water rights disputes…”

“Extraneous to the settlement.” “Engender additional litigation.”  “Excessive if … viewed as settlement consideration.”   

Those aren’t my words – they’re this administration’s words.  In fact, the administration expressed so many reservations about aspects of these settlements that we can only conclude that these are not settlements negotiated by the Attorney General and presented to Congress, but rather a grab-bag written by Congress itself and now rubber-stamped by the Administration on political and not legal grounds.

We were initially told that the Attorney General never comments on the validity of claims, but we found this to be false.  For example, in the Colville case in 1994 involving a similar water rights settlement, when the Attorney General’s office believed we had a weak case and should settle, they warned us that we are “not that well postured for a victory on this claim” and that “the outcome could easily be a significant cost to the taxpayers and the public.”

That’s not what they’re saying in this case.

          Mr. Speaker, we have many more Indian Water settlements pending for vast quantities of water and substantial sums of money.  We need to get our act together on this.

I believe Congress needs to demand that the administration be candid and forthcoming in all claims for settlement, and that Congress insist that before it begins deliberating on a settlement, that the Attorney General has conducted and completed the negotiations, determined all the details, certified that the settlement is within the legal liability of the government and only then submits that settlement for consideration by Congress. 

          Anything less is breaching the fiduciary responsibility that we hold to the people of the United States. 

 

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Congressman McClintock will hold the following town hall meetings in August:
 
August 5
6:00 PM
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August 7
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Satellite Office Hours

Office staff members are available to assist constituents with problems or concerns at satellite office locations held throughout the district.  Anyone wishing to discuss an issue of federal concern is invited to attend one of these satellite office sessions and speak with a member of staff.  For more information, or to reach staff, please call the district office at 916-786-5560.
  
Upcoming July Office Hours:
 
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Jackson 
Friday, July 18th
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Placerville
Thursday, July 10th
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330 Fair Lane
 
El Dorado Hills 
Thursday, July 10th
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El Dorado Hills Chamber of Commerce
2085 Vine Street, #105
 
South Lake Tahoe 
Thursday, July 17th
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South Lake Tahoe Public Utility District
1275 Meadow Crest Drive
 
Fresno County
 
Auberry 
Wednesday, July 23rd
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33049 Auburn Rd
 
Madera County
 
Oakhurst 
Tuesday, July 22nd
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Yosemite Visitor Bureau Conference Room
40637 Highway 41
 
Coarsegold 
Wednesday, July 9th
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Mariposa County
 
Mariposa 
Tuesday, July 22nd
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Library Conference Room
4978 10th Street
 
Nevada County
 
Truckee 
Thursday, July 24th
10:00 am - 11:00 am
The Town Of Truckee
10183 Truckee Airport Rd
 
Placer County
 
Auburn 
Tuesday, July 15th
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Placer County Government Center 
CEO 3 Meeting Room
175 Fulweiler Avenue
 
Lincoln
Tuesday, July 15th
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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600 6th Street
 
Rocklin 
Tuesday, July 22nd
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Rocklin City Hall
3980 Rocklin Rd
 
Tuolumne County
 
Sonora 
Monday, July 14th
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Small Business Center Conference Room
99 N. Washington St
 
 
For further information on satellite office hours, please call 916-786-5560.